Reflecting on COVID-19 and our Food Systems, with Jodey Nurse

Welcome to Episode 3 of the Wilson Institute Speaker Series, Self-Isolation Edition. In this video, Jodey Nurse (a visiting assistant professor at the Wilson Institute for Canadian History) will reflect on COVID-19 and our food systems. Dr. Jodey Nurse is an L. R. Wilson Assistant Professor at the Wilson Institute for Canadian History. A graduate of Queen’s … Continue reading Reflecting on COVID-19 and our Food Systems, with Jodey Nurse

Enemy Alien with Kassandra Luciuk and nicole marie burton

In episode 2 of our Wilson Institute Speaker Series, Self-Isolation Edition, we talk to Kassandra Luciuk and nicole marie burton about their latest book: Enemy Alien: A True Story of Life Behind Barbed Wire, which was published in March 2020. Their graphic novel tells the story of Canada’s first national internment operations through the eyes … Continue reading Enemy Alien with Kassandra Luciuk and nicole marie burton

The American South, Slavery in the United States, and the Canadian Rebellion of 1837-38, with Maxime Dagenais

Welcome to Episode 1 of the Wilson Institute Speaker Series, Self-Isolation Edition. In this video, Max (the coordinator of the Wilson Institute for Canadian History) will introduce the series and talk about his own research in progress: the American South, Slavery in the United States, and the Canadian Rebellion of 1837-38. If you want to … Continue reading The American South, Slavery in the United States, and the Canadian Rebellion of 1837-38, with Maxime Dagenais

Sketches of Everyday Enslaved Black People in the Canadian Maritimes, with Amani Whitfield

On 5 November 2019, Dr. Harvey Amani Whitfield presented a wonderful paper titled: "Sketches of Everyday Enslaved Black People in the Canadian Maritimes." This was part of our Race and the Colour of Democracy Speaker Series. Dr. Harvey Amani Whitfield is professor of American and Canadian History at the University of Vermont. He is the author of, … Continue reading Sketches of Everyday Enslaved Black People in the Canadian Maritimes, with Amani Whitfield

Freedom’s Carceral Landscape: Counter Insurgency, Incarceration, and Racial Formation, with Max Mishler

This year's visiting speaker series is titled "Race and the Colour of Democracy." Our first speaker, Dr. Max Mishler, presented a paper titled: "Freedom’s Carceral Landscape: Counter-Insurgency, Incarceration, and Racial Formation after the Civil War." Dr. Max Mishler is assistant professor of American history and the Atlantic world. He received his PhD from New York University … Continue reading Freedom’s Carceral Landscape: Counter Insurgency, Incarceration, and Racial Formation, with Max Mishler

Statue Wars with Steve Paikin, Vanessa Watts, James Daschuk, and Christopher Moore

A few weeks ago, we hosted an event titled The Statue Wars: Is the global movement to tear down problematic memorials erasing history? Moderated by TVO’s Steve Paikin, a discussion panel featuring Vanessa Watts, James Daschuk, and Christopher Moore discussed the conflicts in Canada and around the world over statues and commemorations. This event was hosted in … Continue reading Statue Wars with Steve Paikin, Vanessa Watts, James Daschuk, and Christopher Moore

An Indelible or Tenuous Right? A Reflection on the Evolution of Canadian Citizenship Through the Lens of British War Brides and Their Children

Chelsea Barranger “Will they let me be buried a Canadian, if they won't let me live as one? I'm serious, because it is that important to me … it's my total identity.” [1] -- Sheila Walshe, Kelowna, BC, CBC News, “In Depth: Lost Canadians War Babies in Limbo,” March 2007 When the Stephen Harper Conservative government … Continue reading An Indelible or Tenuous Right? A Reflection on the Evolution of Canadian Citizenship Through the Lens of British War Brides and Their Children